Know All About What Nuts To Add To Your Food Storage

All food items (unless otherwise noted) should be stored clean (free of insects, and insect eggs), dry (low moisture content is generally better, except for certain root vegetables stored whole), cool (40 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, which is 5 to 18 degrees Centigrade), and well-sealed.

Protein, Carbs, and Fat are the three essential macronutrients needed by the human body. Stored foods should include good sources of Protein and Carbs and Fat; you will have to decide for yourself which foods, and how much of each food, to store.

Peanuts are technically a legume, but are included here because they are nutritionally similar to nuts and seeds. Nuts, seeds, and peanuts are high in protein, and many are either a complete protein, or nearly complete.

Nuts, seeds, and peanuts are also high in fat and calories, and so are a good source of stored food energy. Do not buy and store raw nuts, raw seeds, or raw peanuts.

The raw product may contain insect eggs that will hatch and infect the stored food. Also raw peanuts can sometimes grow fungus.

Either buy seeds and nuts raw and bake them yourself, or buy them already roasted. You can also kill any insects and eggs that might be in bulk seeds and nuts by freezing in a deep freezer (zero degrees F) for 3 to 4 days; a refrigerator freezer might not be cold enough.

Dry roasted and salted nuts keep better, because any added oils might go rancid, and because salt is a preservative. Dry roasted, salted, seeds and nuts are best. Nuts and seeds store well, but not indefinitely.

Peanut Butter stores well, though not indefinitely, and is high in fat and protein.Not a complete protein, but so high in protein that it provides sufficient quantities of all essential amino acids.

Roasted and salted peanuts are also a good source of protein and fat. Peanuts and peanut butter are a fairly good source of omega-6 fat but contain little omega-3 fat.

Omega-6 and omega-3 fats are essential nutrients. Peanuts are relatively inexpensive.

Roasted and salted sunflower seeds are a good source of protein and fat. Not a complete protein, but so high in protein that it provides sufficient quantities of all essential amino acids.

Roasted and salted almonds are a good source of protein and fat. They are a fairly good source of omega-6 fat but contain no omega-3 fat.

Not a complete protein, but so high in protein that it provides sufficient quantities of all essential amino acids. Are more expensive than peanuts and sunflower seeds, but provide variety to the diet.

Pistachios are a good source of protein and fat. Pistachios are a complete protein, and are high in protein.

They are a fairly good source of omega-6 fat but contain little or no omega-3 fat.

Pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein and fat. Pumpkin seeds are a nearly complete protein (80% ideal amount of lysine), and are very high in protein.

Although many websites say otherwise, there is no evidence that any type of pumpkin seed is high in omega-3 fatty acids. Pumpkin seeds are a good source of omega-6 fatty acids.

Soybeans are a legume, but are included here because they are high in protein and fat, and because they can be prepared and eaten like seeds and nuts. Soybeans are a complete protein, are high in lysine, and are very high in protein.

The fat in soybeans includes both essential fatty acids, omega-6 and omega-3. Roasted soybeans are not as tasty as other seeds and nuts, but what they lack in taste they make up for in nutrition.

English walnuts are the most common variety of walnut; if the package just says ‘walnuts’ it is most likely an English. English walnuts are a good source of protein and fat.

The fat in English walnuts includes both essential fatty acids, omega-6 and omega-3.

English walnuts are not as high in protein as many other seeds and nuts, but are high in healthy fats.

The protein in English walnuts is nearly complete, except for a less than ideal amount of lysine.

Sesame seeds are a nearly complete protein, except for a less than ideal amount of lysine. Sesame seeds are a good source of omega-6 fatty acids, but have little or no omega-3 fat.

They are not as high in protein as other seeds and nuts.

As you can see, adding nuts to your food storage can ensure you get essential nutrients in times that food is rationed or scarce. BOLA TANGKAS